2006-2010

Fall 2010

Tuesday, August 10
1:00 – 2:30 p.m.
Do’s and Don’ts of Handling Difficult College Students
Facilitated by Peter Wooldridge, Executive Dean, Student Learning, Development and Support
Brian Van Brunt, Director of Counseling and Testing at Western Kentucky University, and Perry Francis, Counseling Professor in the Department of Leadership and Counseling at Eastern Michigan University, will step beyond mere theory to deliver live video demonstrations of strategies faculty members can use to manage some of the most persistent and common classroom problems that arise.  This webinar will cover the following content: ways to recognize and attend to misbehavior in its early stages, strategies to prevent further escalation of problem behaviors, and appropriate intervention strategies for different styles of behavior.

Tuesday, August 10
5:00 – 8:30 p.m.
New Faculty Orientation
Presented by Gabby McCutchen, Coordinator, TLC and Faculty Development
New full-time and part-time faculty are invited to participate in the New Faculty Orientation.  Participants learn campus resources available to faculty, new strategies for teaching adult learners, and effective techniques in course planning.  RSVP with your Program Director by Monday, August 9th to participate.

Wednesday, August 11
11:30 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.
New Faculty Orientation
Presented by Gabby McCutchen, Coordinator, TLC and Faculty Development
New full-time and part-time faculty are invited to participate in the New Faculty Orientation.  Participants learn campus resources available to faculty, new strategies for teaching adult learners, and effective techniques in course planning.  RSVP with your Program Director by Monday, August 9th to participate.

Wednesday, August 25
1:30 – 2:30 p.m.
Mapping & Networking: How Knowing Where You Came From Can Inform Where You’re Going
Presented by Tracy Mancini, Assistant Dean, Associate in Arts; and Kara Battle, Chair, Science
A picture can paint a thousand words indeed.  In this interactive session, participants will create and share visual maps of their professional journeys to help identify talents, strengths, and opportunities that could inform or enhance their present work and professional partnerships.  They will also brainstorm ways to use their maps as a resource for goal setting and professional development planning.

 Monday, August 30
1:00 – 2:00 p.m.
Cognitive Psychology and Teaching
Presented by Peter Wooldridge, Executive Dean, Student Learning, Development and Support
In this session, Peter Wooldridge will lead a discussion on research in cognitive psychology and how research findings can be used to enhance instruction in the classroom.  Participants can expect both accommodation and assimilation!

Friday, September 10
10:00 – 11:00 a.m.
Resources for Instructional Content
Presented by Karen McPhaul, Assistant Dean, Instructional Technology
This presentation will explore various web sites where instructors can search for digital content to supplement their courses.  We will explore the NC Learning Object Repository (NCLOR) – a joint project of NC Community Colleges, UNC System, and others – where instructors can share content such as documents, learning modules, assessments, multimedia clips, etc.  We’ll also look briefly at other online sources of educational content such as Academic Earth, Connexions, and OER Commons.

 Tuesday, September 14
3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Effective Research-Based Departmental Professional Development
Presented by Cheryl Keeton, Department Head, Math and Physics, Wake Technical Community College
A professional development model that focuses on modeling quality, involving faculty in their learning, and having faculty self-assess their progress over a long period of time will be shared.  Communication methods, tools, and techniques that can easily be adapted and adopted will be demonstrated.  Connections to research will show support for this approach.  Descriptions and examples of data collection instruments, both quantitative and qualitative, will be shared.  Participants will learn simple methods to support professional development projects within a department.

Friday, September 17
10:00 – 11:00 a.m.
Turnitin.com and Safe Assign
Presented by Tracy Mancini, Assistant Dean, Associate in Arts; and Lea Bingham, Chair, English and Communications
According to a July 14, 2010, article in The Herald-Sun, “more than 60 percent of undergraduates nationwide admitted recently to cheating on assignments and exams.” This presentation will explore ways to use Durham Tech’s subscription to Turnitin.com and Blackboard’s SafeAssign to inform students about academic dishonesty.

Thursday, September 23
2:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Globalization and Community Colleges
Presented by Neil Bolick, Associate Director, World View, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
This presentation explores globalization as an international system, the flattening of the world, and the challenges it brings to North Carolina community college educators.  It also examines the skills U.S. students need in a “flat” world.

Tuesday, September 28
12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
Admissions Process Updates
Presented by Iesha Cleveland, Director, Admissions; Stilwyn Perry Brown, Admissions Counselor; and Katherine Mentnech, Admissions Counselor
This panel discussion will focus on admissions requirements for curriculum students enrolling in certificate, diploma and degree programs at Durham Tech. Other topics discussed will include the following: residency status for tuition purposes, transfer credit, and admission to limited-enrollment programs.  The presentation will also serve as an update to changes in the admission processes since the Spring 2010 TLC presentation, “Understanding the Admissions Process.”

Friday, October 1
10:00 – 11:00 a.m.
LMS Team Information Session
Presented by Durham Tech’s Learning Management Team
For the past year, Durham Tech’s Learning Management System (LMS) Team has been exploring issues facing the college regarding its current learning management system (Blackboard).  The team has spent many hours educating ourselves about Blackboard’s future plans and examining two open source alternatives, Moodle and Sakai.  This fall, as part of a small-scale pilot, three team members are teaching online courses using Sakai.  In this session, team members will share what we have learned so far and discuss where we are in the process.  For more information on the LMS Team, visit http://courses.durhamtech.edu/wiki/index.php/LMS_Team

Tuesday, October 5
1:00 – 2:00 p.m.
Bilateral Agreements for AAS Degree Students
Presented by Mary Marsha Cupitt, Advising Coordinator
Many opportunities exist for students with Associate in Applied Science (AAS) degrees to earn their Baccalaureate degree.  Come hear about degrees tailored to the needs of the AAS student that have been developed by a variety of universities in the state.  Appalachian State University, ECU, UNC-Charlotte, UNC-Greensboro, and Western Carolina all have programs designed to facilitate opportunities for a four-year degree for the AAS student.

 Wednesday, October 20
1:00 – 2:00 p.m.
Durham Tech Financial Aid Q&A
Presented by Kay Jedlica, Director, Financial Aid
Back by popular demand!  Join Kay for an information session about the college’s financial aid processes. A significant amount of time will be dedicated to answering your questions about financial aid.

Friday, October 29
11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Demons and Death: A Historical and Biological Perspective
Presented by Gretel Guest, Instructor, Biology and Botany
Just in time for Halloween!  Join Gretel for a fascinating look at ethnomycology and ethnobotany and the “spooky” legends and true histories of creepy fungi and plants.

 Wednesday, November 3
2:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Service-Learning Ideas and Implementation
Presented by Erin Riney, Instructor, Developmental English and Reading and Coordinator, Service Learning
Interested in service-learning but not sure where to begin?  In this session, we’ll begin with a brief overview of service-learning and a demonstration of helpful online resources.  Then we’ll move into the main work of this TLC:  workshopping answers to your questions about using service-learning as a teaching and learning strategy.  Any level of familiarity with service-learning—from mildly curious to semi-pro—is welcome to join the discussion  At the end of this TLC session, you’ll have a greater understanding of this method and how to use it, including specific ideas for implementing service-learning in your classroom and several resources to support you in the process.

 Monday, November 8
3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Introduction to Jing Videos for Instruction
Presented by Susan Horton, Coordinator, Learning Technologies and Training; and Charlene West, Associate Dean, Information Systems Technologies
Please Note Location: Tech Center, Room 952
How are my colleagues making those great instructional videos to put online? Join us for a hands-on Jing workshop and find out! Space is limited and registration is required. Online registration will be available early fall 2010 at: http://courses.durhamtech.edu/training/.

Jing is a free tool that allows you to capture images or make short videos to demonstrate how to do tasks on your computer. Jing videos can be embedded in Blackboard or linked from a web site to share with your students. Jing is available for use on PCs or Mac. The video length is a 5 minute max with the free version of the product. For more info about getting started with Jing, visit: http://jingproject.com/.  Please note that Windows and keyboarding/mouse skills are required. 

Friday, November 12
11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Introduction to Jing Videos for Instruction
(Repeat of Workshop on Monday, November 8)
Presented by Susan Horton, Coordinator, Learning Technologies and Training; and Charlene West, Associate Dean, Information Systems Technologies
Please Note Location: Tech Center, Room 952
How are my colleagues making those great instructional videos to put online? Join us for a hands-on Jing workshop and find out! Space is limited and registration is required. Online registration will be available early fall 2010 at: http://courses.durhamtech.edu/training/.

Jing is a free tool that allows you to capture images or make short videos to demonstrate how to do tasks on your computer. Jing videos can be embedded in Blackboard or linked from a web site to share with your students. Jing is available for use on PCs or Mac. The video length is a 5 minute max with the free version of the product. For more info about getting started with Jing, visit: http://jingproject.com/.  Please note that Windows and keyboarding/mouse skills are required.

Thursday, November 18
3:30 – 4:30 p.m.
Web Accessibility: Just the Facts
Presented by Jason Morningstar, Accessibility Specialist, UNC – Chapel Hill

Making electronic content accessible to everyone is a laudable goal – and a legal requirement. But what, exactly, does “accessible” mean? How can it be implemented without massive outlays of time and money? What complies with state and federal mandates, and is that enough for genuine accessibility? Jason Morningstar, an authority on accessibility at UNC Chapel Hill, will offer some clear answers and practical tips in this non-technical and informative session.

Spring 2010

Tuesday, January 5
2:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Excellence in Teaching Workshop: Bring Your Stuff in a Box
Presented by Tracy Mancini, Gabby McCutchen, and Nate Smith, 2009-2010 Excellence in Teaching Committee
Each year, the Excellence in Teaching (EIT) committee awards a full-time faculty member with the Excellence in Teaching award based on his/her submission of a teaching portfolio. This annual workshop prepares potential portfolio developers to create their own teaching portfolios.  Join your colleagues for a discussion of the value of the teaching portfolio, portfolio development experiences, and the EIT requirements for the annual portfolio development stipend and award.  Portfolio materials and light refreshments will be provided.

Wednesday, January 6
2:00 – 5:30 p.m.
New Faculty Orientation
Presented by Gabby McCutchen, TLC/Faculty Development Coordinator
New full-time and part-time faculty are invited to participate in the New Faculty Orientation.  Participants learn campus resources available to faculty, new strategies for teaching adult learners, and effective techniques in course planning.  RSVP with your Program Director by Monday, January 4th to participate.

Wednesday, January 13
12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
Learn How to Complete a Grade and Attendance Report
Presented by Danelle Smith, Secretary, Research, Evaluation, Assessment, and Planning
Learn how to correctly fill out grade and attendance reports, blue slips, and drop/withdrawal forms. Get the due dates for the year. This session will make your job go a lot easier when it is time to complete the grade and attendance report.

Friday, January 22
10:00 – 11:30 a.m.
Don’t Lose Your Cool: Strategies for Managing Disruption
Presented by Tom Jaynes, Dean, Advising, Counseling, and Student Development
Review the stages of verbal escalation and rehearse stage-specific strategies for how to respond to irrational students without losing your cool.  Come prepared to yell at your co-workers (to give them a chance to learn some calming techniques)!

 Wednesday, January 27
2:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Teaching and Learning with Google Docs
Presented by Brent McCardle, Opticianry Instructor
Instructors, are you looking for a way to keep all of your docs in sync?  There’s an app for that.  Are you looking for a way to collaborate with your students on a paper and make corrections in real time?  There’s an app for that.  Are you looking for a way to post presentations on Blackboard easily?  There’s an app for that.  Math instructors, are you looking for a way to put formulas in a document easily?  There’s an app for that.  Join Brent in the TLC for a demonstration of the many Google doc features that apply to instruction.

Thursday, January 28
1:00 – 2:30 p.m.
Meeting the Unique Needs of Veteran Students: A Student Perspective
Facilitated by Wayne Durkee, Advisor, Student Veterans of America Club
The transition from military to college can be an overwhelming process.  Explore ways to improve the academic success and well-being of this growing student population.  During the presentation a student veteran will describe the unique needs of guardsmen and reservists, behaviors and stressors unique to the population, and the unique nature of women who have served and been in combat.  This webinar is the first of four offerings designed to focus our attention on the needs of Durham Tech’s career technical student veterans.

Tuesday, February 2
1:00 – 2:30 p.m.
Designing Programs to Support Veteran Students: Orientation, First Year Experience and Institutional Policies
Facilitated by Wayne Durkee, Advisor, Student Veterans of America Club
This webinar will review the characteristics of returning veterans relative to general student populations, i.e. age, military experience, education, diversity, training, other demographics.  Specifically, it will focus on programs and activities designed to welcome returning veterans into the university community and to maintain contact and support throughout their term of enrollment. The speakers will discuss designing veteran-specific orientation and First-Year Seminar programs.  This webinar is the second of four offerings designed to focus our attention on the needs of Durham Tech’s career technical student veterans.

Thursday, February 4
4:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Principles of Adult Learning and its Applications to Teaching
Presented by Luis Olivieri-Robert, Spanish Instructor
A traditional view of education holds that the instructor is expert responsible for passing on that expertise to learners. A different approach is needed when teaching adult learners. The structure needs to be developed to respond to the characteristics of the learner, understanding their knowledge, life-experiences, and expectations while incorporating it to the learning environment and curriculum. This short presentation, based on recent academic research, will share principles of adult learning and ways to apply it to course design. It will be itself an example of an adult learning experience.

 Tuesday, February 9
12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
Learn How to Complete a Grade and Attendance Report
(Repeat of January 13 Session)
Presented by Danelle Smith, Secretary, Research, Evaluation, Assessment, and Planning
Learn how to correctly fill out grade and attendance reports, blue slips, and drop/withdrawal forms. Get the due dates for the year. This session will make your job go a lot easier when it is time to complete the grade and attendance report.

Thursday, February 11
3:30 – 5:00 p.m.
Identifying and Managing Aggressive Student Behaviors, Attitudes and Emotions
Facilitated by Tom Jaynes, Dean, Advising, Counseling, and Student Development
This webinar is designed to assist faculty and staff to better understand how to identify and manage aggressive behavior in those around them. The training is centered on the research of John Byrnes, a nationally recognized leader in aggression management.  The training will include a discussion of the signs and symptoms of the trigger, crisis and escalation phases of aggression, the difference between primal and cognitive aggression and the art of “safe escape” from aggressive individuals and dangerous situations.  The webinar is co-hosted by the Advising, Counseling, and Student Development Department and the Campus Police & Public Safety Office.

Friday, February 19
11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Emphasizing Globalization at Durham Tech: An Introduction to the Center for the Global Learner (CGL)
Presented by María J. Fraser-Molina, Associate VP and Executive Director, CGL
Find out the mission and strategic goals of the newly created Center for the Global Learner.  Meet its faculty and staff and learn about ongoing and future activities and initiatives.  Share your own ideas as to how the CGL can assist you in achieving your class, program, or department outcomes.  Light refreshments will be provided. 

Thursday, February 25
1:00 – 2:00 p.m.
Understanding the Admissions Process
Presented by Iesha Cleveland, Admissions Director; Stilwyn Perry Brown, Admissions Counselor; and Marge Newhouse, Counselor/Admissions Officer for International Students
Find out what it takes to get admitted to Durham Tech. This panel discussion will focus on admissions requirements for curriculum students enrolling in certificate, diploma and degree programs at Durham Tech. Other topics discussed will be: residency status for tuition purposes, transfer credit and international student enrollment.

 Tuesday, March 2
2:30 – 3:30 p.m.
Exploring and Applying Cultural Humility
Presented by Karin Abell, ESL Director
As society becomes more diverse and multinational, there are challenges and responsibilities in education and workplace settings. In this session, you will learn about cultural humility and how this principle is being applied in several settings, including health care.

 Friday, March 5
1:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Veteran Students: Creating a Trauma Informed and Military Friendly Campus
Facilitated by Wayne Durkee, Advisor, Student Veterans of America Club
The first part of this webinar will introduce the complex anatomy of the common human responses to traumatic events.  The second part of the webinar will focus on military trauma-specific issues. By becoming “trauma informed” and creating a military friendly culture a community college will be better prepared to help veterans in their transition and help to ensure their academic success.  This webinar is the third of four offerings designed to focus our attention on the needs of Durham Tech’s career technical student veterans.

 Thursday, March 11
1:00 – 2:30 p.m.
Providing Quality Services to Veterans’ Family Members – The Hidden Students on Our Campuses
Facilitated by Wayne Durkee, Advisor, Student Veterans of America Club
A major focus has been directed toward serving veterans on campus. While those services are essential, campuses are often failing to provide needed services for those significant others who are attending college and impacted by military service.  This webinar will demonstrate how campuses can organize to provide quality services for military families and their significant others.  This webinar is the last of four offerings designed to focus our attention on the needs of Durham Tech’s career technical student veterans.

 Thursday, March 18
3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Placement Testing at Durham Tech
Presented by Erica Sessoms, Placement Testing Coordinator

Many Durham Tech students depend on their placement test scores to determine which classes they start with in college.  In this session, Erica will describe the many placement tests that Durham Tech offers.  She will also share tips on how to be successful on the placement test and how to effectively review for the placement test, information that we can pass along to students.  Bring a pencil and your questions about the placement tests.

Monday, March 22
4:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Screaming in a Vacuum:  Communicating via Discussion Boards
Presented by Kerry Cantwell, English Instructor
In this session, Kerry Cantwell will discuss discussion board assignments that create a community of students while still providing richness to the course content.  Feel free to bring your own successful discussion board assignments to share.

Thursday, March 25
12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
Grade Around: QEP Oral Communication Assessment
Facilitated by Lea Bingham, Chair and Instructor, English and Communications
Want to learn about the new QEP assessment instrument for oral communication?  Then come and practice using it for your in-class presentation assignments! We will have sample presentations available to review and assess together.  Communication instructors will give tips on what to look for when evaluating student presentations, and participants will have the opportunity to discuss the process and their responses.

Wednesday, March 31
3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
21st Century Skills for the DTCC Student
Presented by Angela Fipps, Math Instructor; Jamey Darnell, Business Administration Program Director/Instructor, and Al Jones, Adult Basic Education Instructor
Angela, Jamey, and Al will share an overview of the 2009 World View Symposium they attended in October of 2009.  The workshop will focus on philosophical and pedagogical arguments for four 21st Century Skills that we should teach our students.  In addition, the presenters will share practical ways to implement these skills into courses taught in university transfer, technical programs, developmental education, and basic skills.  Time will also be allotted for the attendees to share their own ideas and for the group to brainstorm together.

 Friday, April 9
11:00 a.m. – noon
Aiding and Assisting Adjunct Faculty
Presented by Karin Abell, ESL Director; Lea Bingham, English/Communications Chair/Instructor; Gabby McCutchen, Teaching-Learning Center Coordinator; and Tom Murphy, Computer Programming and Applications Program Director/Instructor
The success of many of Durham Tech’s programs relies on our talented adjunct instructors. During this roundtable discussion, we will share some of the ways in which we support adjuncts through the TLC and our individual departments.  We will also facilitate a brainstorming session on how we might better support our valuable adjuncts.  Program directors and chairs are especially encouraged to attend.

Friday, April 16
11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
My Favorite Tech Tools (follow-up sharing session)
Presented by Instructional Technologies Staff
Last May we gathered in the TLC to share our favorite instructional technology tools. This follow-up sharing session will give faculty the opportunity to share ideas about tools you’ve been using and new tools that you’ve found.

Wednesday, April 21
12:15 – 1:15 p.m.
Sustainable Architecture Design
Presented by Tim Watson, Introduction to Sustainable Design (ARC 210) Instructor
Do you know there are underutilized, low-cost ways to help make our campus landscaping “greener” as well as serve students as a learning tool?  Some strategies include “xeriscaping” landscaping, planting selected trees to reduce building cooling loads, natural soil rejuvenation, and rainwater harvesting.  These topics along with ideas about “greening” our curricula will be discussed.

 Tuesday, April 27
12:30 – 1:30 p.m.
Don’t shut me out! The Impact of Affective Filtering on the Adult Learner
Presented by Shannon Hahn, Spanish Instructor
We all know that our students bring lots of baggage to class, aside from their overloaded book bags! But, have we stopped to consider how those emotions and experiences affect their ability to learn from us? Come join me in a discussion of affective filtering, an integral part of current language teaching pedagogy applicable to any classroom setting, regardless of subject. We will first learn how affective filtering impacts our students and then explore ways in which we can work to lower those filters and help our students be more successful.

Thursday, April 29
3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
QEP Poster Session and Panel Discussion: Semester Lessons Learned
Facilitated by Melissa Ockert, QEP Oversight Committee Chair
Join us to share and discuss best practices and lessons learned for using the new QEP written and oral communication instruments.  Instructors who used the instruments will present their experiences and results.  Participants will learn best practices for incorporating written and oral communication assignments into their courses and assessing them in accordance with the Quality Enhancement Plan.

Friday, May 7
1:00 – 2:00 p.m.
Learning Matters Reception
Presented by Gabby McCutchen, TLC Coordinator
The fourth volume of Learning Matters will be published in Spring 2010.  Join other faculty and staff for light refreshments and stimulating discussions on this volume’s theme: faculty research through Communities of Learning, Inquiry, and Practice (CLIP).  All previous Learning Matters contributors will be recognized.  Light refreshments will be provided.

Fall 2009

Wednesday, August 12
10:00 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. and 5:00 – 8:30 p.m.
New Faculty Orientation
Presented by Gabby McCutchen, TLC/Faculty Development Coordinator
New full-time and part-time faculty are invited to participate in one of two New Faculty Orientation sessions.  Participants learn campus resources available to faculty, new strategies for teaching adult learners, and effective techniques in course planning.  RSVP with your Program Director by Monday, August 10th to participate.

Thursday, August 27
3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Integrating Communication Activities in Biology Classes
Presented by Steve Leadon, Biology Instructor
An important aspect of biology course work is to teach students to effectively communicate.  I will discuss some of the activities that I use in my biology classes, including research papers, oral presentations, and discussion boards and describe how these activities are integrated into the course and evaluated.  Participants will learn new strategies in teaching students to communicate effectively in classes other than English.

Tuesday, September 1
2:30 – 3:30 p.m.
Lights, Camera, Action!  Did you know that NC LIVE now has free movies?
Presented by Julie Humphrey and Susan Baker, Reference Librarians
Many award winning documentaries from Frontline, the American Experience, and more can now be seen on your computer via NC LIVE.  Join us for a demonstration to learn about this and more of the exciting features that NC LIVE has to offer – from interactive tutorials to e-books, from career resources to specialized subject databases, there’s something for everyone!  Please join us to learn about NCLIVE and other online tools that the library provides for Durham Tech faculty, staff, and students.

Wednesday, September 9
3:30 – 4:30 p.m.
“Greening” Durham Tech: An Introduction to the President’s Climate Commitment
Presented by Julie Hoover, Geology Instructor and Chair of the PCC Committee
This TLC will explore our requirements as an American College and University President Climate Commitment college. We will discuss the carbon inventory and what it means to achieve climate neutrality and brainstorm methods of meeting the tasks on our check list.

Friday, September 11
11:00 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
How Service-Learning can Serve your Students
Presented by Erin Riney, Developmental English and Reading Instructor
Service-learning sounds like a terrific idea—integrating real-world applications of learning with service to the community in a way that truly engages students—but often leaves those who hear about it with many questions. How is service-learning “done”?  What would this look like in my Durham Tech classroom?  And why is it hyphenated?!  In this session, we’ll demystify service-learning by discussing its history, (continued on next page) theory, merits, and criticisms and by answering the FAQs of this teaching and learning method.  A panel of Durham Tech instructors will also discuss experiences with service-learning on our campus and answer your questions.  At the end of this TLC session, you’ll have a more comprehensive understanding of service-learning’s goals and applications, ideas for how to use it in your classroom, and several helpful resources to assist you in incorporating this dynamic method into your courses.

 Thursday, September 24
1:00 – 2:00 p.m.
What Works for Me: Using Group Work Effectively
Presented by Lyndsay Al-Shibli, Developmental English and Reading Chair and Instructor; Lea Bingham, English and Communications Chair and Instructor; Carol Barman, Clinical Trials Instructor; and Martin Terry, Automotive Technology Instructor
Do you like the idea of group work but are unsure how to implement it and manage it in your classroom?  Come hear panelists from several areas at the college discuss what techniques and strategies have worked well for them when implementing group work as part of the regular curriculum in their classes.  This TLC will be an interactive discussion, so bring your own questions and ideas to help facilitate the conversation.

Friday, September 25
11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Communities of Learning Inquiry and Practice: Writing CLIP
Presented by Theresa Fine-Pawsey, English Instructor; Janice Kerber, Accounting Instructor; Janel Mays, English Instructor; Robbi Muckenfuss, Reading Instructor; and Tom Murphy, Computer Programming Program Director and Instructor
The Writing CLIP members will present their results, conclusions, and reflections on their research, which investigates the types of writing assignments that are most effective in technical courses and how those assignments affect students’ attitudes toward writing.

Monday, September 28
12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
What can REAP do for you?
Presented by Patrick Hines, REAP Database Manager
Need to know where and how to find important data for planning the future of your department or program? Attend this seminar to find out what resources are available to you and how to make the most of those resources.

Wednesday, September 30
2:30 – 3:30 p.m.
Managing Disruptive Classroom Behavior
Facilitated by Tom Jaynes, Advising, Counseling, and Student Development Dean
Angela Provitera McGlynn, Professor Emeritus at Mercer Community College, has 35 years of teaching experience and is a nationally-recognized expert on college classroom civility.  Participants in this webinar will learn how to create a positive tone at the start of the semester, prevent disruptive behavior from occurring in the first place, handle side conversations, manage technology-related disruptive behaviors such as cell phones, and deal with incivilities should they occur.  Don’t miss this great opportunity to learn from a colleague.

Friday, October 2
11:00 a.m. – noon
Using Student-Created Wikipedia Sites to Reach Intended Learning Outcomes
Presented by Lyndsay Al-Shibli, Developmental English and Reading Chair and Instructor
Lyndsay has developed a group project for her Developmental English and Reading students that requires students to design, develop, and maintain a class Wikipedia site.  Come learn how easy implementing Wiki sites in the classroom can really be.  This TLC will offer a quick tutorial of Wetpaint.

Monday, October 5
4:00 – 5:00 p.m.
MLA Update
Presented by Kerry Cantwell, Perry Cumbie, Theresa Fine-Pawsey, and Tracy Mancini, English Instructors
The seventh edition of the MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers includes significant changes in documentation style.  Join a panel of English faculty for an overview of these changes.

 Tuesday, October 6
3:30 – 4:30 p.m.
Data Collection in a Capstone Course
Presented by Liz Penton, Anthropology and ASUT Capstone Instructor
This session showcases a model for Program Assessment by using a capstone course with data capturing system.  While this course is for University Transfer Program Assessment, its method can be adapted to any curriculum.  Dr. Penton will walk attendees through the overall process of collecting data on program learning outcomes by demonstrating the development of rubrics for HUM 212, one of the ASUT Program Capstone courses.

Monday, October 19
3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Keeping Their Dreams
Presented by Beth Shulman, Coordinator, Single Parent Program and Dreamkeepers Emergency Assistance Program
Our college’s Dreamkeepers Emergency Assistance Program is in its fifth year.  Come learn about the program and how it works, about the students we’ve assisted, and what the big picture is for this amazing program.

Wednesday, October 21
1:00 – 2:00 p.m.
Middle College at Durham Tech
Presented by Charles Nolan, Principal, Middle College High School
An innovative high school model, the middle college high school is a school for 11th and 12th grade students who wish to challenge themselves by following a hybrid schedule of community college classes, and honors level high school classes. Admission is by application, and students may earn a year or more of university credit, and/or industry certification for free as part of their K-12 education.

Friday, October 23
10:00 – 11:00 a.m.
Durham Tech Financial Aid Q&A
Presented by Kay Jedlica, Financial Aid Director
Join Kay for an information session about the college’s financial aid processes. A significant amount of time will be dedicated to answering your questions about financial aid.

Thursday November 5
12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
College Credit for High School Students
Presented by Michelle Gladman, High School Liaison
Michelle will host a “brown bag” discussion about the Dual Enrollment and Huskins Bill programs. Information will be provided about the focus, process, and regulations of each program. Please bring your lunch and any comments, concerns, or questions you might have about these programs. Additionally, part of the discussion will be dedicated to sharing any experiences you have had specifically related to having high school students in your classes.

Tuesday, November 10
3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Memory and the Learning Environment
Presented by Barry Oakley, Math Instructor
Does memory play a big factor in the learning process?  If so, what are some ways to help students stimulate that memory?  Come to a workshop that shows some of those ways:  music, acting, silly songs, cheers, etc.  Come and have a good time learning mathematics, and see how these memory devices can be used in your classroom.

Tuesday, November 17
2:00 – 3:00 p.m.
What Works for Me: Teaching Hybrid and Online Classes
Presented by Carol Barmann, Clinical Trials Research Associate Instructor; Vernon Bridges, Developmental Math Chair and Instructor; Kerry Cantwell, English Instructor; and Wilma Herndon, Health Instructor
Get tips for tracking attendance, using the discussion board effectively, incorporating instruction that addresses a variety of learning styles, and  discussion about the differences between seated instruction and hybrid/online instruction. See examples for developing activities with high student interest, finding ways to encourage students to apply skills, using real-world applications and interactive project ideas.

Wednesday, November 18
11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Communities of Learning Inquiry and Practice: Using a Student Response System in the Classroom
Presented by Helen Ayres, Associate Degree Nursing Program Director; Lois Ballen, Associate Degree Nursing Instructor; Lesley Chaffin, Associate Degree Nursing Instructor; and Jason Berry, Associate Degree Nursing Instructor
In this presentation, nursing faculty will share their research-based answers to the following questions and more:  What are the advantages of a student response system or “clicker” for students?  for faculty?  What are the disadvantages?  Can a student response system be easily incorporated into existing course materials?

Thursday, November 19
2:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Ecuador: People, Places, and Things
Presented by Charles Slappy, Sociology Instructor
DTCC ethnographers will present various aspects of Ecuadorian cultures through photographs and narratives.  This is the culmination of activities from a recent trip to Quito.

Wednesday, December 2
3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Looking Deeper into Entering Student Engagement:  Making Even More Sense of the SENSE Data

Presented by LaSylvia Stewart, Institutional Research and Planning Coordinator
For the past two years, Durham Tech has administered the Survey of Entering Student Engagement (SENSE) in several developmental and first college-level English, math, and reading classes. SENSE was designed to help community colleges focus on the front door of the college experience – what entering students experience from the moments of their first interactions with the college – to improve persistence and success.  Join LaSylvia Stewart for an in-depth look at our results!

Wednesday, December 9
1:00 – 2:00 p.m.
Communicating with SBAR
Presented by Audrey Kern, Respiratory Therapy Instructor, and Richard Miller, Respiratory Therapy Program Director
Miscommunication is the most common cause of patient injury and death. SBAR is a formalized method of communicating that is widespread within hospitals and could be adapted to other disciplines.

Spring 2009

Wednesday, January 7
4:00 – 7 :30 p.m.
New Faculty Orientation
New full-time and part-time faculty are invited to participate.  Participants learn campus resources available to faculty, new strategies for teaching adult learners, and effective techniques in syllabus and course planning.  RSVP with your Program Director by Monday, January 5th to participate.

Friday, January 23
11:00 a.m. – noon
What Works For Me: Calculating and Weighting Student Grades
Presented by Kerry Cantwell
Join us for a discussion of the best way to determine course grades.  Do you use a point system?  Do you weight percentages?  How much are quizzes worth?  Come share with us what works for you.

Thursday, January 29
3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Student Conduct: New Procedure Review
Presented by Tom Jaynes
Tom Jaynes, Dean of Student Development, will review the new process for managing inappropriate and disruptive student behavior.  Learn to distinguish inappropriate behaviors from disruption.  Know what to do if and when a student displays misconduct.

Friday, January 30
11:00 a.m. – noon
Strategies to Reveal Student Understanding and Enhance Learning
Presented by Elise Barrett, School of Education, UNC – Chapel Hill
This presentation will begin with a simple strategy to involve students in a collaborative process through which they integrate, apply, and synthesize newly acquired information from peers and course work into a brief plan of action. Strategies covered during this presentation will help instructors to frequently monitor knowledge acquisition and enhance learning through embedded instructional activities.

Tuesday, February 3
4:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Adjunct Faculty Success: Considering Learning Styles in Lesson Planning
Presented by Laura Gorham
In this interactive workshop, participants will learn about learning styles and how instructors can stimulate students’ learning styles through effective lesson planning.  Participants will apply techniques for meeting the diverse learning styles of our students.   All are welcome, and adjunct instructors are especially invited to attend.

Wednesday, February 4
4:00 – 5:00 p.m.
Adjunct Faculty Success: Considering Learning Styles in Lesson Planning
REPEAT OF 02-03-09 SESSION
Presented by Laura Gorham
In this interactive workshop, participants will learn about learning styles and how instructors can stimulate students’ learning styles through effective lesson planning.  Participants will apply techniques for meeting the diverse learning styles of our students.   All are welcome, and adjunct instructors are especially invited to attend.

Thursday, February 5
1:00 – 2:00 p.m.
Webconferencing using GotoMeeting
Presented by Tom Murphy
NOTE: This session will take place in Tech 976.
Learn how Citrix’s GotoMeeting webconferencing software can be used to enhance student learning opportunities by interacting in real-time over the Internet. Instructors and students can see each other’s desktop, communicate using Voice-over IP (VoIP) and collaborate to see solutions unfold.

Wednesday, February 11
3:30 – 4:30 p.m.
Development of an Educational Philosophy – Through the Prism of Race, Power, and Class
Presented by Pam Senegal
Come and join a rich facilitated discussion based on the writings of Ian Baptiste and his model of Teaching with the Grain to help develop your unique educational philosophy by examining issues related to race, power and class.

Friday, February 13
9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Teaching and Delivering Services to the Community College Millennial Student
Presented by Pat Akers, NC-NET
Do you know who makes up your class or student body? Are there different generations present? This workshop will provide information on how you can design and deliver learning experiences or services that encourage student success in all areas. Topics include discussions of the generation cycle and characteristics of the millennial students, as well as best practices and tools to work effectively with this new generation of students.

Participants will learn about applying the seven principles of effective teaching, delivery of services to students, and how to develop strategies to make their learning environments rich and productive.  Please register with Gabby McCutchen (mccutcheng@durhamtech.edu) to participate.  Other North Carolina community college faculty and staff will also be invited to participate.

Monday, February 16
3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Faculty Said/Student Said Part 2 (Rescheduled from Fall 2008)
Presented by LaSylvia Pugh
In Spring 2005, nearly 500 students and nearly 200 faculty members participated in the Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE) and the Community College Faculty Survey of Student Engagement (CCFSSE), respectively. Three years later, both surveys were administered again. Join LaSylvia for a lively discussion on student engagement from the student point of view and the faculty point of view. Has anything changed since 2005? The answer to this question and more!

Friday, March 6
11:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.
Introduction to CLIPs (Communities of Learning, Inquiry, and Practice)
Presented by Gabby McCutchen
During this interactive workshop, participants will learn about the CLIP model and about the CLIP projects that are going on this academic year.  Participants will also have an opportunity to talk with other potential campus researchers about questions that interest them.

Tuesday, March 17
2:30 – 3:30 p.m.
What Works For Me: Connecting the Classroom to the World
Presented by Kerry Cantwell
“When will I ever need to know this in the real world?”  Come discuss with us ways to make classroom material relevant to our students.

Monday, March 23
3:30 – 4:30 p.m.
Smoke and Mirrors in Classical Mayan Iconography
Presented by Liz Penton
From self-sacrifice to feathered serpents, this lecture has it all.  Find out what it meant to be a Mayan Queen centuries ago, when one’s chief obligation was to negotiate the spirit realm.  This lecture will feature the arts of the ancient Maya, including jade objects, sculptures, and temple architecture.  Learn about the expert calendar system and other wonders of the Mayan vision of the cosmos.

(Other lectures in the Global Arts and Culture series were 2007 – Inuit Sculpture; 2006 – Chinese Landscape Painting; 2005 – Ancient Benin; 2004 – Islamic Art & Architecture.)

 Wednesday, March 25
1:00 – 2:00 p.m.
Academic and Workplace Behaviors Part 1
Presented by Margaret Skulnik and Lyndsay Al-Shibli
What does it means to “contribute positively to the academic and workplace environment by demonstrating expected behaviors”?  This statement appears in the College’s Vision for a Learning College.  But, this General Education Learning Outcome leaves much open to interpretation.  Join Margaret Skulnik and Lyndsay Al-Shibli for a round-table discussion as they attempt to create a college-wide definition that helps us understand how to “contribute positively” and demonstrate “expected behaviors.”

Tuesday, March 31
3:30 – 4:30 p.m.
Engaging the Community to Foster Program Success
Presented by Melissa Ockert
The mission of Durham Technical Community College is “…to enrich students’ lives and the broader community through teaching, learning, and service.”  In order to successfully accomplish this mission, it is important to involve community representatives in several aspects of classroom and program activities.  The purpose of this presentation is to discuss how the Clinical Trials Research Associate program engages the community to meet the College mission and facilitate program and student success.

Friday, April 3
11:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Middle Skill Jobs – Why the Region Needs Career and Technical Programs
Presented by Pam Senegal
Come and hear the latest information about regional needs for specific career and technical skills and how our programs are aligning to meet those needs. This session will feature a panel discussion with community and program directors.

Wednesday, April 8
1:00 – 2:00 p.m.
Academic and Workplace Behaviors Part 2
Presented by Margaret Skulnik and Lyndsay Al-Shibli
Now that we know what it means to “contribute positively to the academic and workplace environment by demonstrating expected behaviors” (previous TLC on March 25th), join Margaret Skulnik and Lyndsay Al-Shibli as they now discuss interpretations of this Learning Outcome and share strategies for how you can successfully tie this Learning Outcome to what you teach in your classes.

Thursday, April 16
3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Lost in Transition: A Snapshot of First Generation Learners
Presented by Gary Snyder and Gabby McCutchen
Based on solid psychological theories, including Erikson and Maslow, this presentation will examine a unique segment of our population who depend heavily on the college to create a foundation pathway to their success.  These first generation college students need appropriate attention, expectations, and preparation, so they can better navigate towards their goals.  This interactive session will interest academic advisors, ACA instructors, orientation leaders, club advisors, college administrators as well as classroom teachers.

Tuesday, April 21
3:30 – 4:30 p.m.
“At Home in the World: Bridging the Gap between Internationalization and Multicultural Education” (Rescheduled from Fall 2008)
Presented by María Fraser-Molina and Marianela Mañana
Based on the American Council on Education series of working papers on internationalizing higher education in the US, this presentation will clarify the different terminology and concepts, find areas of potential synergy, share successful examples and discuss possible cooperation among areas of the college.

 Tuesday, April 28
3:30 – 4:30 p.m.
Five Keys: Engaging Faculty in Learning Outcomes Assessment
Presented by Mary Anne Grabarek
In this interactive session, Mary Anne Grabarek will continue the college conversation about learning outcomes assessment with an overview of some ideas developed by Dr. Gary Gigliotti of Rutgers University who says that there are ways to engage faculty in the assessment process, to change attitudes, and to make assessments a more welcome part of academic life.  Come and lend your expertise and comments to this ongoing discussion.

Wednesday, April 29
1:00 – 2:00 p.m.
Academic and Workplace Behaviors Part 3
Presented by Margaret Skulnik and Lyndsay Al-Shibli

To “contribute positively to the academic and workplace environment,” in part, means being a part of a team and working toward a common goal.  If our General Education Learning Outcome suggests such a positive contribution, isn’t it up to us, as instructors, to help our students understand what it means to work in a group?  Join Margaret Skulnik and Lyndsay Al-Shibli as they present ideas for how you can promote group work in your classes to help students solve problems and how to navigate the pitfalls of facilitating such group work.

Friday, May 1
11:00 a.m. – noon
What Works For Me: Syllabus Planning for Next Semester
Presented by Kerry Cantwell

As we close out the semester and begin planning for the next, we’re likely thinking about what worked this semester and what didn’t.  How much detail do you include in your next syllabus?  Is their room to make changes in your assignments?  How does syllabus layout affect student understanding of your assignments?  Come discuss with us your ideas about syllabus planning.

Fall 2008

Tuesday, August 12
10:30 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.
New Faculty Orientation

Wednesday, August 13
5:00 – 8:30 p.m.
New Faculty Orientation

Tuesday, August 19
10:00 – 11:00 a.m.
Library Resources made Incredibly Easy
Presented by Wendy Ramseur and Susan Baker
Library resources will be made incredibly easy for faculty and staff during this hour-long session. Topics will cover faculty-specific support such as interlibrary loan, instruction, research support, databases, i-link catalog, reserves, routing periodicals, and more.

Monday, August 25
1:00 – 2:30 p.m.
How to Approach and Engage African American Men in the Classroom

Presented by Demetrius Thompson and George King
NOTE: THIS SESSION WILL TAKE PLACE IN COLLINS 278
This session will focus on identifying academic, cultural, and personal barriers that impede a faculty or staff member from approaching an African American male student.  It will also highlight the most crucial factors inhibiting their progress and will provide strategies that may be a catalyst in improving their academic, social, personal, and professional development.

 Thursday, August 28
12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
Strategies for Preventing Plagiarism
Presented by Lea Bingham, Lyndsay Al-Shibli, and Susan Sutton
Join us for a lunch and learn discussion of ways to prevent plagiarism.  The panel will share approaches to discussing academic honesty with students, strategies for teaching students how to avoid plagiarism, and ways to make it difficult for students to plagiarize.  Bring your lunch and your own successful strategies!

Tuesday, September 2
12:30 – 1:30 p.m.
Teaching Circles Article Discussion
Presented by Kerry Cantwell
Join other instructors in a discussion of a timely article from the Chronicle of Higher Education.  The article will be announced one week prior to the discussion.  Bring your lunch and your experiences!

 Wednesday, September 10
3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
The YouTube Class Connection
Presented by Janice Stuart
Engaging our students can be quite challenging.   Given their high-octane connection to today’s technology, our students need instruction in which contextual learning can take place.  Youtube and the Internet can provide tools that offer context to increase student learning in many types of classes.

Wednesday, September 17
2:30 – 3:30 p.m.
Community Resources for Hispanic Students: El Centro Hispano
Presented by Pam Senegal
Join us as we talk with members of downtown Durham’s El Centro Hispano staff to discuss community resources available for Hispanic students. You will also have a chance to meet other community leaders and gain a better understanding of some of the challenges facing local Hispanic students. Light refreshments will be served. Please RSVP to Pam Senegal (senegalp@durhamtech.edu).

Thursday, September 18
3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Globalization of Career and Technical Courses

Presented by Ken Clever with panelists: Micara Lewis, Randy Egsegian, Nate Smith
As a follow-up to the TLC session last February, panelists will discuss the results of their efforts to “globalize” a course.   The presentation will guide other faculty members in addressing globalization and cultural behavioral issues in their courses – especially career and technical courses.

Friday, September 19
1:00 – 2:30 p.m.
Teaching Troubled Students: Campus Policy and Threat Assessment
Online Seminar Facilitated by Tom Jaynes
Please join colleagues from around the country on September 19 for a new online seminar led by one of the foremost authorities on campus law, Gary Pavela.  The online presentation will give you important insights on at-risk students and how your institution should respond to them.  In this content-rich, 90-minute seminar, Mr. Pavela will look at myth and fact, law and policy, theory and practice.

Monday, September 22
4:30 – 5:15 p.m.
Adjunct Faculty Success: The Learner-Centered Environment
Presented by Theresa Fine Pawsey
Learn how to energize and motivate your students with active learning strategies.  Bring a lesson or lecture that could use some excitement!

Tuesday, September 23
4:30 – 5:15 p.m.
Adjunct Faculty Success: The Learner-Centered Environment
Presented by Laura Gorham
REPEAT OF 9-22 SESSION
Learn how to energize and motivate your students with active learning strategies.  Bring a lesson or lecture that could use some excitement!

Thursday, September 25
11:30 – 12:30 p.m.
Communities of Learning, Inquiry, and Practice (CLIP): Best Practices in Faculty Research
Presented by Beverly Parsons, Executive Director, InSites
Across the country, colleges increasingly are focusing on the scholarship of teaching and classroom research. The CLIP model facilitates faculty and staff research in a way that efficiently leads to enhanced teaching and learning.  Beverly Parsons, the founder of CLIP, will lead a discussion of best practices from her work with practitioner research. This session will also offer a glimpse into the CLIP work happening at Durham Tech this year.

Monday, September 29
2:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Connecting the Daily Lesson Plan to Course Objectives
Presented by Robbi Muckenfuss

During this presentation, we will discuss lesson planning and the connection to – you guessed it – learning outcomes and course objectives.  How does everyday teaching connect with the “language” of instruction?

Tuesday, September 30
3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Research, Evaluation, Assessment, and Planning at Durham Tech
Presented by Mary Anne Grabarek
Durham Tech is moving forward in assessment and planning. Come and find out about the new efforts in evaluation and research at the college.

Monday, October 6
12:30 – 1:30 p.m.
Teaching Circles Article Discussion
Presented by Kerry Cantwell
Join other instructors in a discussion of a timely article from the Chronicle of Higher Education.  The article will be announced one week prior to the discussion.  Bring your lunch and your experiences!

Monday, October 6
4:30 – 5:15 p.m.
Adjunct Faculty Success: Classroom Assessment Techniques
Presented by Theresa Fine Pawsey
Are you interested in knowing what your students have learned before you give the big test?  Learn how to use CATS to discover what your students are learning and how to better meet their learning needs.

Tuesday, October 7
4:30– 5:15 p.m.
Adjunct Faculty Success: Classroom Assessment Techniques
Presented by Laura Gorham
REPEAT OF 10-6 SESSION
Are you interested in knowing what your students have learned before you give the big test?  Learn how to use CATS to discover what your students are learning and how to better meet their learning needs.

Wednesday, October 8
3:00 – 3:30 p.m.
7 Time Management Strategies for Busy Durham Tech Employees

Presented by Gabby McCutchen
As community college faculty and staff, we often wear many different hats.  Join Gabby for a 30-minute interactive tutorial on how to manage your time (and balance those hats!) effectively.

Thursday, October 9
11:00 – 11:30 a.m.
7 Time Management Strategies for Busy Durham Tech Employees
Presented by Gabby McCutchen
REPEAT OF SESSION ON 10-8

As community college faculty and staff, we often wear many different hats.  Join Gabby for a 30-minute interactive tutorial on how to manage your time (and balance those hats!) effectively.

 Tuesday, October 21
12:00 – 1:00 p.m.
Durham Tech Study Abroad Program: Learning Based Travel
Presented by Shannon Hahn
Have you ever wondered about those Study Abroad trips you hear about every year? What exactly do they have to do with the mission of the college? Come hear how the program is structured around learning and what has been done to target specific learning outcomes. Students not only travel to a foreign country; they participate in a valuable cultural experience blending classroom learning and interaction with the local culture on various levels. Please note: This is not a photo-sharing session of past trips but a discussion of the program itself.

 Wednesday, October 22
2:30 – 3:30 p.m.
Excellence in Teaching: Portfolio Development
Presented by Bonnie Tilson, Nate Smith, and Gabby McCutchen
Faculty members are invited to learn how to develop their teaching portfolios at this popular annual event. We’ll share samples, portfolio development experiences, and the EIT requirements for the annual portfolio development stipend and award.

Tuesday, October 28
3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Speaking of Diversity
Presented by Pam G. Senegal
How do we develop our views on race, power, and privilege?  Much of our thinking in this area begins during our formative years, and is then shaped by environmental forces. As we become a more global community, understanding and appreciating the views of our peers and students on these topics will become of critical importance. Join a diverse (country of origin, race, religion, sexual orientation, physical disability…) for lunch, using the conversation guide (http://courses.durhamtech.edu/tlc/www/html/Calendar/SoDConversationGuide.doc), and then join the larger group to continue the discussion.

Thursday, October 30
3:30 – 4:30 p.m.
How to Teach Controversial Subjects to Students
Presented by Bonnie Tilson and Penny Gluck
Back by popular demand! This session continues the discussion Bonnie and Penny started in the spring semester.  They will explore how establishing classroom rules for discussion and creating a non-confrontational classroom atmosphere can help you engage students in meaningful class discussions, so they learn to explain their own ideas and listen to ideas with which they disagree.  Please come prepared to share ideas about facilitating classroom discussions.

Friday, October 31
11:00 – 12:00 p.m.
Math is Life
Presented by Elecia Ridley and James Weeks
Math is a part of every academic field of study.  Come to this presentation to learn how math relates to the subjects you teach and the subjects you studied as a college student.

Tuesday, November 4
12:30 – 1:30 p.m.
Teaching Circles Article Discussion
Presented by Kerry Cantwell
Join other instructors in a discussion of a timely article from the Chronicle of Higher Education.  The article will be announced one week prior to the discussion.  Bring your lunch and your experiences!

Wednesday, November 5
11:00 – 12:00 p.m.
Looking Deeper into Entering Student Engagement:  Making Even More Sense of the SENSE Data
Presented by LaSylvia Pugh
Last spring, LaSylvia Pugh shared the preliminary results of the Survey of Entering Student Engagement  (SENSE) pilot study. Join LaSylvia this fall to look deeper into the SENSE results to examine factors, such as age, enrollment status, etc. that might impact entering student engagement.

Thursday, November 6
2:00 – 3:00 p.m.
Confidentiality: A Help or Hindrance?
Presented by Counseling Services Staff
The 2007 murders at Virginia Tech have raised a national dialog on how administrators, faculty and staff should react if warning signs of an impending tragedy are present. Issues of privacy, confidentiality, and politics are all part of this discussion.  So, what can or should you say about students to the media or each other if such an event were to occur on our campus?  The Counseling staff will lead a discussion on issues of confidentiality and privacy as it affects students, faculty, and staff.

 Tuesday, November 11
3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Education-Related Vocational Visits in South Australia
Presented by Karin Abell
Learn about the presenter’s findings and observations from an October 2008 Group Study Exchange trip to South Australia. This presentation will include information from vocational visits to educational institutions in the region visited.

Friday, November 14
11:00 a.m. – noon
How Learning Outcomes Help Shape Our Teaching and Learning
Presented by Mary Anne Grabarek
Credit programs have been using student learning outcomes to understand what students are learning.  Find out how this data is collected and reported across the campus and beyond.

Monday, November 17
3:00 – 4:00 p.m.
Beyond the Vision…Application of Civility in Health Technologies
Presented by Melissa Ockert and Margaret Skulnik
The work of the health professional necessitates civility when working with patients, team members and clients.  To reflect this, the Health Technologies department has developed the Principles of Community and Civil Discourse for Health Technologies faculty, staff and students.  What is civility?  How does it relate to our work on campus and with students? Come and learn more about this groundbreaking work.

 Monday, December 1
12:30 – 1:30 p.m.
Teaching Circles Article Discussion
Presented by Kerry Cantwell
Join other instructors in a discussion of a timely article from the Chronicle of Higher Education.  The article will be announced one week prior to the discussion.  Bring your lunch and your experiences!

Spring 2008

January 8    
New Faculty Orientation
10:30-2

January 15  
Introduction to Library Resources
Wendy Ramseur
2 sessions: 10-11 a.m. and 3-4 p.m.
The sessions will focus on searching the shared community college online catalog, using print resources, maximizing electronic databases, as well as a host of other services offered by the library.

January 22  
Assessment speaker
Allen Dupont, Director of Assessment, NC State
2:30 p.m.                     
Allen Dupont, Director of Assessment at NCSU, will visit us to talk about how student learning assessment data is tabulated and used to improve student learning at NCSU.

January 23  
Toning Things Down a Bit:  Graphing Calculator, Scientific Calculator
Vernon Bridges and Hussein Islami 
2 p.m. 
Can’t afford a graphing calculator?  Don’t have much of a use for a scientific calculator?  Well surely you have a pocket calculator lying around somewhere.  We’ll show you how to put that baby to use in a number of everyday situations.  Calculators will be available!

January 24  
EIT Portfolio Development: Bring Your Stuff in a Box
Nate Smith, Gabby McCutchen, Bonnie Tilson
3:30 p.m.      
Join the Excellence in Teaching committee in an interactive workshop designed to provide you with direction and camaraderie as you develop your professional portfolio. Please bring any materials that might become part of your portfolio. Light refreshments and some materials for portfolio development will be provided.

January 28  
How to Teach Controversial Subjects to Students
Bonnie Tilson and Penny Gluck
3 p.m.
One of the greatest gifts we can give our students is teaching them how to express their ideas on controversial subjects without confrontation and how to be fair-minded thinkers.  Do you teach controversial subjects in the classroom?  If you lead class discussion about abortion, euthanasia, the death penalty, same-sex marriage or any other controversial subject, you will want to participate in this roundtable.  We will explore how establishing classroom rules for discussion and creating a non-confrontational classroom atmosphere can help you engage students in meaningful class discussions so they learn to explain their own ideas and listen to ideas with which they disagree.  Please come prepared to share ideas about facilitating classroom discussions.

January 31  
The Comprehensive Articulation Agreement (CAA): The Myth and Reality
Tom Gould
3 p.m.  
This encore presentation will focus on the fact and fiction regarding the transfer student protections and rights afforded by the Comprehensive Articulation Agreement between the community college and UNC Systems. Part of the presentation will include a review of information about DTCC’s various AAS bi-lateral agreements and new Study Track agreements with UNC’s Radiologic Science Program, NCSU’s College of Management, and ECU’s Engineering School. All University Transfer and AAS advisors are encouraged to attend.

February 1   
Copyright Issues  
Peggy Hoon, NC State
10:30 a.m.
Peggy Hoon, Special Assistant to the Provost for Copyright Administration
North Carolina State University, will give a presentation on the current copyright issues that arise in post-secondary institutions and information about avoiding copyright challenges.

February 12
What can Faculty Development be at DTCC?
Virginia Lee
Noon – 2 p.m.
Virginia S. Lee is the 2007 President Elect of the Professional and Organizational Development Network in Higher Education and the former Associate Director of the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning at NC State University.  In this workshop, Virginia will facilitate an active brainstorming session for faculty to help them articulate their professional development needs and wants.  All faculty who are interested in their own professional development should attend.  The results of this session will impact future TLC planning, scheduling, and offerings.8

February 14, 21, and 28
First Aid Spanish
Connie Gomez-Joines
3 Thursdays 14/21/28 Noon to 1 p.m., Registration Required
These sessions will provide all interested faculty and staff members with some basic vocabulary and grammatical expressions for extending the hand of welcome to our Hispanic students and neighbors.

February 15
Research Learning Community
Gabby McCutchen
12:00-1:30 p.m.
Durham Tech’s participation in Achieving the Dream has helped transform our campus culture into one that is data driven.  We have new information about our students and their global rates of persistence and success.  But maybe you want to learn more about your own classes.  Maybe you want to collaborate with other faculty members to conduct research on your teaching practices.  Attend this TLC session to join a community of your peers who are also interested in research on teaching and learning.  Novice to expert researchers welcome!

February 20
Adjunct Faculty Success  
Theresa Fine-Pawsey
3 p.m.
This first of two workshops designed especially for adjunct faculty will familiarize new and established instructors with Durham Technical Community College services and resources and give instructors an opportunity to meet and share ideas for success.

February 25
Socrates Bar & Grill
Teaching and learning the scientific method (Part II): Using scientific reasoning as everyday philosophy
Jorge Cortese
2 p.m.
Understanding scientific reasoning is a key skill to critically observe the world around us.  In the second presentation of this series, we will discuss how to use the principles and steps of the scientific method in your classrooms to foster discussion in a range of issues, to enhance the teaching of critical thinking and support modern models of inquiry-based leaning in undergraduate education. For those teaching non-technical subjects, we will also discuss how scientific thinking easily develops into an everyday philosophy that helps to critically compare statements about the world outside the laboratory – which is what philosophical systems are supposed to do.

February 28
Global Technical Programs
Maria Fraser-Molina and Ken Clever
3 p.m.
Ken Clever and María Fraser-Molina will lead a presentation on the intersection of globalization, career training, and curriculum development.  The discussion will focus on technical and occupational education in a globally connected community.  Participants will share ideas on how career training needs can be effectively balanced with curriculum limitations and resources.

March 10      
Developmental Math – Students Click for Excellence
Elecia Ridley, Vernon Bridges, and Andrew Ball 
3 p.m.
What’s all that racket in the developmental math classes?  It just might the excitement generated by students using our new technology – Turningpoint keypads, AKA “clickers.”  We will discuss how we’re using the technology to increase student engagement and performance at all levels of developmental math.

April 1           
Durham Crisis Response Center
Leslie Thompson
2-3:30 p.m.
Do you know how to respond if a student confides in you that she/he has been sexually assaulted?  Learn how you can help and learn about services offered by the Durham Crisis Response Center.  Leslie Thompson, Sexual Assault Crisis Intervention Specialist, and her colleagues assist victims and survivors on a short and long-term basis.  Hear about their services and also learn about volunteer opportunities for yourself or your students

April 2           
Skills You Better Have! Workplace Skills For Success
Teretha Bell, Mary Moore, Tom Russo
2:30 p.m.
Join us for a frank discussion with a panel of prominent local employers sharing their views on the critical skills necessary for employment. Learn which skills are required for success beyond formal education. Faculty, staff, student leadership, ACA, HRD, Mentor program and DTCC students, and partners are encouraged to participate.

April 3           
Poster Session:  Assessment
Lyndsay Al-Shibli 
3-4:30 p.m.
Come to this session to see what faculty in various programs are doing to assess student learning.  There will be posters on display and an opportunity to talk with colleagues about assessment efforts.

April 7           
Adjunct Faculty Success  
Theresa Fine-Pawsey
3 p.m.
The second Adjunct Faculty Success workshop will give previous participants a chance to reflect on newly acquired resources and strategies, while providing first-time participants the opportunity to meet and share ideas.

April 11         
Disruptive, Distressed, or Dysregulated
Tom Jaynes
10:00-11:30 a.m.
Tom Jaynes will develop a framework for participants to understand and appropriately respond to students in crisis, either in the classroom or in student service settings.

April 17         
African American Men in College
Demetrius Thompson and George King
11 a.m. Collins Building, room 278
This session, presented by Demetrius Thompson, will focus on promoting the academic, cultural, and social advancement of African American males. It will also highlight the most crucial factors inhibiting their progress and will provide strategies that may be a catalyst in improving their present situation. Note location: room 278.

April 22         
Are Our Students Starting Out Right? Making SENSE of Student Engagement
LaSylvia Pugh  
2 p.m.
Last fall, curriculum students participated in the Survey of Entering Student Engagement (SENSE), which focuses on institutional practices and student behaviors in the earliest weeks of college. Current research indicates that engaging new students early and helping them succeed through the first semester can dramatically improve persistence and, ultimately, goal attainment. Join LaSylvia Pugh for a lively discussion of the survey results and find out if our students are starting out right.

April 24         
Student Success Roundtable
Gabby McCutchen
2 p.m.
This interactive discussion will feature a panel of real, live Durham Tech students.  The student panel will share their first impressions of Durham Tech, their experiences in the classroom and out, and their academic and career goals.  This TLC presentation will complement LaSylvia’s SENSE presentation on Tuesday by putting a face on the data.


Fall 2007

August 13
New Faculty Orientation
10:30 a.m.-2 p.m.

August 28
Make-up Testing Service
Robbi Muckenfuss and Amelia Shapiro
3 p.m. (follow-up Dec. 3)

August 30
Effective Communication – especially for staff
Pam Senegal
3:30 – 4:30 p.m.

September 4
Durham Tech’s Transfer Center
Mary Marsha Cupitt
2 p.m.
We will discuss the mission statement of the Durham Tech Transfer Center, the bi-lateral agreements, and the Transfer Center Blackboard site that will assist faculty in advising students on Transfer. We will discuss the various book-marked web-sites and their use in guiding students in their course selection. We will discuss the bi-lateral agreements and ways in which the Transfer Center can assist Durham Tech faculty in developing plans that will facilitate transfer.

September 7
But I Don’t Have Time For That! Using Portfolios to Incorporate Interdisciplinary Topics and Target Critical Thinking Skills – Without Creating a Time-Consuming Project for Students or Teachers
Shannon Hahn
10 a.m.
Based on portfolio assignments used in Spanish 111/112 classes, we will look at ways to get students thinking more critically about the subject matter and about how it connects to their other classes. The project also encourages students to work on their writing skills throughout the semester. The session will include student feedback on the portfolios and some lessons learned in how to develop effective (yet surprisingly simple) prompts.

September 10
Twenty minutes to expertise: Training on the new FTE form: Quick Tips
Wayne Durkee
11 a.m. and 2 p.m.
Faculty and departmental staff members are invited to spend a few minutes learning about our new FTE form and how to fill it out. This 20-minute session could save you hours of work!!

September 11
Achieving the Dream at Guilford Tech
Kathy Baker Smith
2:00-3:30 p.m.
Durham Tech has been involved with the Achieving the Dream effort for several years. Guildford Tech is also working with the Achieving the Dream effort. Kathy Baker Smith, Vice President for Educational Support Services at Guildford Tech will share what her college has discovered about student persistence and success from data they have collected.

September 12
Is It Legal?
Christine Kelly-Kleese
2
 p.m.
Christine Kelly-Kleese will repeat this important session on which of your class policies are legal and enforceable in the classroom.

September 13
Hispanic Community Outreach
Pam Senegal
3:45-4:45 p.m.
Are you aware of all the services and programs available to Hispanic students at Durham Tech? Do you know about the ESL Nursing Assistant program? What about the Spanish Automotive program? What’s the status of Durham Tech accepting undocumented students? Join us for an informative session, where you’ll walk away with a list of resources you can share with Hispanic students.

September 14
Results from the latest Non-Returning Student Survey
Sheza Healy
12-1 p.m.
Sheza Healy will present the results of the survey conducted by contacting students who do not return from fall semester to spring semester to find out why they did not come back to Durham Tech.

September 18
Getting Comfortable with Disability Services: Part I
Paula Rubio and Paula Compton
2:30 p.m.
What is a disability? What is required? How can you help? What are student responsibilities?  How’s your disability etiquette? Are you over accommodating? If you are a faculty or staff person needing answers to these and other disability services questions, please attend a two-part workshop with Paula and Paula.

September 19
SBAR Training
Kellie Hayworth
Durham Tech/GlaxoWellcome Technology Center, room 900
3-5 p.m.
The guest speaker will be Kellie Hayworth from WakeMed Hospital and she will lecture on SBAR.

September 21
Writing Test Questions
Mack Henderson
10 a.m.
Mack Henderson will discuss tips for writing T/F questions, multiple choice questions, matching, short answer, and essay questions. Do’s and don’ts, good and not-so-good examples will be provided.

September 25
Getting Comfortable with Disability Services: Part II
Paula Rubio and Paula Compton
2:30 p.m.
Specific faculty questions

September 27
Grade Around
Lea Bingham, Tracy Constantine, and Perry Cumbie
12:30 p.m.
Come practice using the QEP rubric to evaluate student writing. We’ll have a couple of short essays that we can read and evaluate using the rubric together. English teachers will give tips on what to look for when evaluating student writing, and participants will have the opportunity to compare their responses with others and discuss the process.

October 1
Tutorial Services Available
Amelia Shapiro
3 p.m.
This session will highlight the services available to students in the tutoring center.

Starting October 2
Advising Institute
T
om Jaynes
Advising Center, Wynn Student Services Center, room 1200
Tuesday, October 2, 2 – 4:30 p.m.
Friday, October 5, 9 – 11:30 a.m.
Thursday, October 11, 9 – 11:30 a.m.
Monday, October 15, 2 – 4:30 p.m.
Thursday, October 25, 2 – 4:30 p.m.
Friday, November 2, 2 – 4:30 p.m.
This workshop introduces advisors to the college’s expectations for advising, the student data system used for information access, the available web resources, and the campus services available to support students. Registration is required.

October 2
Excellence in Teaching: Portfolio Development
Nate Smith
3:30 p.m.
Faculty members are invited to learn more about how to develop their teaching portfolios at this popular event. Materials will be provided. This will be our only EIT workshop this semester.

October 4
Making the Implicit Explicit: Learning Outcomes
What is embedded assessment, anyway? Learning by Design
Peter Wooldridge
2:30 p.m.
Peter Wooldridge will lead a discussion about using specific assignments to facilitate student achievement of learning outcomes.

October 9
Colleague Update: Tips and Tricks
Robin Lamb
1:30 p.m.
Robin Lamb will provide an overview of the colleague conversion and answer your questions about what is coming next.

October 10
Adjunct Faculty Survival
Theresa Fine-Pawsey
12:30 p.m.
Adjunct faculty have a new space in the Phillips Building and access to many resources, but it’s still a challenge to drive in, teach, and drive back out. Theresa Fine-Pawsey will lead a discussion of the ins and outs of being an adjunct at Durham Tech.

October 11
Black Psychology: Sexual Relationships in African American Communities
Brenda East
Noon
This is the first of two sessions exploring the sexual relationships in African American Communities from a psychological perspective presented by Brenda East.

October 15
Financial Aid: What Does It Mean for Our Students?
2:30 p.m.
Durham Tech’s Director of Financial Aid will discuss what the college provides students in financial aid and student responsibilities. This session is recommended for all academic advisors.

October 23
Black Psychology: Sexual Relationships in African American Communities
Brenda East
Noon
This is the second of two sessions exploring the sexual relationships in African American Communities from a psychological perspective.

October 26
African American Men in College
Demetrius Thompson
Collins Building, room 278
10 a.m.
This session, presented by Demetrius Thompson, will focus on promoting the academic, cultural, and social advancement of African American males. It will also highlight the most crucial factors inhibiting their progress and will provide strategies that may be a catalyst in improving their present situation. Note location: room 278.

October 29
Inuit Sculpture and Traditional “Arts”
Elizabeth Penton
3:30 p.m.
This session will focus on the cultural aspects of Inuit art and sculpture. Liz Penton will suggest an article for review before the session.

November 1
Preparing Students to Learn in an On-line Environment
Kerry Cantwell and Karen McPhaul
10 a.m.
Karen McPhaul and Kerry Cantwell will lead a lively discussion of the ways that students can learn best in an online environment.

November 2
Skills You Better Have! Workplace Skills for Success
Teretha Bell, Mary Moore, and Tom Russo
10 a.m.
Join us for a frank discussion with a panel of prominent local employers sharing their views on the critical skills necessary for employment. Learn which skills are required for success beyond formal education. Faculty, staff, student leadership, ACA, HRD, Mentor program and DTCC students, and partners are encouraged to participate.

November 5
Making the Implicit Explicit: Learning Outcomes
from Assessment to Assignment: using feedback from embedded assignments in the classroom
Peter Wooldridge
2:30 p.m.
Peter Wooldridge will continue his discussion of learning outcomes by showing how his department is using data gathered from writing assignments to make improvements in the learning environment.

November 7
Respiratory Care Preceptor Training
Greg Gassaway
2 p.m.
Faced with increased student enrollment and faculty shortages, modern health care training programs often utilize hospital staff to provide clinical training for their students. This program describes the roles, responsibilities and rewards of clinical preceptors.

STUDENT SUCCESS WEEK
While Durham Tech’s college success course and orientation are relatively new, first year experience programs at universities and colleges have existed for decades. Such programs are designed to help students transition into and out of the first year of college and feel connected to their college campuses and to their own education. Three local universities feature comprehensive first year experience programs, and the programs’ leaders will share their school’s justifications, initiatives, and results.

November 12
Student Success and Retention in MAT 080
Angela Fisher, Barry Oakley, and Peter Wooldridge
2 p.m.
MAT 080 is known as a “gateway” course for university mathematics. Come learn about past success and retention rates for DTCC MAT 080 students, as well as the innovative plans the mathematics faculty and ACA 111 instructors have to continue to improve the performance of students in this course. This is a follow-up session to the original spring 07 report.

November 13
Student Success at NCCU
2 p.m.
Janelle Simmons, Director of Orientation and First Year Experience at North Carolina Central University, will present a program describing NCCU’s student success efforts.

November 14
Student Success at UNC-CH
2 p.m.
Steve Reznick, Associate Dean for First Year Seminars and Academic Experiences at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill, will speak about the first year seminars at UNC-CH.

November 15
Student Success at NCSU
2 p.m.
Carrie McLean, Director of the First Year College at North Carolina State University, will speak about NC State’s FYE programs.

November 16
ACA 111 Instructor Training Reunion
Gabby McCutchen and Penny Gluck
Noon

November 16
Contextual Teaching and Learning: Lessons from the Front
Yaneta Sanchez-Brown
11 a.m.
Members of the Basic Skills Department will share some valuable teaching methods using contextual content.

December 3
Make-up Testing Service
Robbi Muckenfuss and Amelia Shapiro
3 p.m.
This is a second session on the Make-up Testing Service to talk about its effectiveness for the fall semester.


Spring 2007

January 3
Excellence in Teaching Portfolio Development
Bonnie Tilson and Nate Smith
Collins Building, room 286, 10-11 a.m.
Faculty members are invited to learn more about how to develop their teaching portfolios at this popular event. Materials will be provided. This will be our only EIT workshop this semester.

January 3
New Faculty Orientation
Tom Jaynes, Karen McPhaul, Irene Laube, Christine Kelly-Kleese, Peter Wooldridge, Mary Anne Grabarek
Collins Building, room 278, 1-4:30 p.m.

January 8
Then What Happens? How the Early Alert Counselor and Tutors Use the Referral Forms
Nan Dernar, Amelia Shapiro
Wynn Center, room 1115   3 p.m.
This session is designed to help faculty who participate in the Early Alert referral process better understand what happens once a tutor or a counselor receives a referral form. We hope that this information will help instructors feel confident that they are referring students to the right service and providing the right kind of information for each referral. Home-baked goods provided!

January 18
Library Services
Wendy Ramseur and Irene Laube
ERC Building, Library   3-4 p.m.
Come to this session to hear about the library resources available for students, staff, and faculty on campus and online.

January 22
Science class hybrids: Best of Both Worlds (repeat)
Jorge Cortese and Julie Rothwell
Collins Building, room 286    2:30 p.m.
Hybrid formats of a course can be designed to combine the best instructional techniques of traditional and online courses. For students, requirements are less demanding than in the online classroom; for instructors, the format is very flexible and creates an environment that encourages the use of multiple teaching techniques in the most effective form. Using examples from their recently reformatted science courses, Julie Rothwell and Jorge Cortese will show how hybridization can make science courses into ideal vehicles for technological improvements that enhance student learning.

January 23
Unlocking Your Tech Power: Integrating Instructional Technology Into Your Classroom Presentations
Dan Rosenthal
Tech Center, room 904   10a.m.
Dan Rosenthal will demonstrate some ways in which he can provide technological support for classroom teaching.

January 29
Reflecting on Learning: Using Reflective Writing to Enhance Student Learning
Lea Bingham
Wynn Center, room 1115   2 p.m.
Good students engage in constant monitoring of their learning, adjusting their learning strategies in response to feedback and different learning situations. Find out how to use reflective writing to teach all students the crucial skills of conducting error analysis, establishing goals, prioritizing, monitoring their progress, and adapting to different learning challenges.

February 1
Reaching Each Student’s Potential
Svetlana Yokum
Collins Building, room 290    Noon-1 p.m.
In this session we will demonstrate how we can orchestrate a classroom environment where all students can thrive and reach their potential. Drawing on findings from brain research, we will discuss some powerful tricks that enhance memory and learning. We will see how students’ learning blocks can be unlocked and how we can ensure we teach to as many possible learning styles as possible.

February 5
MAT 080: Integration of Student Success Skills for Retention and Persistence
Angela Fisher and Peter Wooldridge
Collins Building, room 286   2 p.m.
MAT 080 is known as a “gateway” course for university mathematics. Come learn about past success and retention rates for DTCC MAT 080 students, as well as the innovative plans the mathematics faculty and ACA 111 instructors have to continue to improve the performance of students in this course. A follow up session will be scheduled for Fall 2007.

February 12
Roundtable: “But My Other Teacher Doesn’t Care”: The Importance of Using Citation Formatting Across the Disciplines
Janel Mays and Brenda Flippen
Collins Building, room 203   9:30 a.m.
Janel Mays and Brenda Flippen will lead a discussion about Academic Honesty and share some tips for citing resources.

February 14
Focus on Global Issues Panel as follow-up to lecture series
ERC Auditorium 3 p.m.
This presentation is a follow up to a presentation on 2/7/07 by Martha Bowen that will explore Christianity, Judaism, and Islam in the context of today’s world. Tracy Constantine will moderate a panel made up of students from the Global Citizen Program and the International Students Club.

February 15
Economic Impact of Hispanics in Durham and Orange Counties
Pam Senegal
CEC, 3:45 – 4:45 p.m.
Did you know that NC’s Hispanic population contributes more than $9 billion to the state’s economy? Come and learn some of the key findings from a recently published report from the UNC Chapel Hill Kenan-Flagler Business School about the impact Hispanics are having in North Carolina. Special emphasis will be placed on their impact in Durham and Orange counties, and the implications for marketing and educational needs.

February 22
Colleague Update
Robin Lamb
Phillips Building, room 381   1 p.m.

February 27
Repelling the Wily Hacker – PC security and you
Harry Bulbrook
Tech Center, room 983   2-3 p.m.
We all use computers, at school, home, and on the road. This workshop will focus on basics of computer and network security, and provide definitions of Viruses, Spyware, and Firewalls. Our resident White Hat will mention a number of things you can do to improve security both at work and at home. He’ll also mention wireless networks and how to secure them. Don’t miss this opportunity to learn basic self-defense here and away.

March 1
Addressing Hidden Bias in the Classroom
Cari Borresen and Chanda Rook
Wynn Center, room 1113   2-3:15 p.m.
This session will focus on ways of identifying and addressing issues of social inclusion in the classroom. Participants will have the opportunity to complete an assessment which will measure and challenge the existence of bias in their individual courses.

March 2
Roundtable: Blackboard Course Design Tips for Enhanced Communication
Karen McPhaul
Wynn Center, room 1117   10 a.m.
How well does your Blackboard course communicate? Faculty are invited to show off their courses and share ideas for posting course content in ways that enhance clarity and facilitate accessibility. We’ll look at a selection of courses in Bb and see various strategies instructors use for organizing folders, customizing menus, incorporating images, etc. From your colleagues’ examples, you’re sure to learn some tips for tweaking your course so that students spend more time engaged in learning and less time trying to find and access course materials.

March 7
Integrating Communication Skills into Content
Sue Cheng, Robbi Muckenfuss
Wynn Center, room 1115   10:30 a.m.
Have you ever wondered how to combine communication skills with the content you must cover in your course? Can it be done?

March 12
Focus on Evaluation
Achieving the Dream Initiatives: Tracking Our Own Data
Christine Kelly-Kleese
Wynn Center, room 1113   3 p.m.
Durham Tech has an internal ACCESS database to track our new First Year Experience initiatives – orientation, ACA course, early alert, mentoring, Dreamkeepers, etc. – come learn what our data are revealing to us.

March 15
Research Resources
LaSylvia Pugh, Sheza Healey, Bridget Burless
Wynn Center, room 1115   2 p.m.
What is Faces of the Future? How are surveys used? How do we use the on-line Planning System? Get answers to these and other questions about Durham Tech’s resources and assessment tools reported on the Evaluation and Research intranet website.

March 22
Darwin
John Martin, Chris Ayala
Wynn Center, room 1115   3 p.m.
A conversation about Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution from historical and psychological perspectives.

March 27
Choosing to be Successful in the Workplace (repeat)
Lee Ann Spahr
Collins Building, room 278   3:30 p.m.
A panel of executives from major international companies will lead a discussion about assisting students in choosing appropriate workplace behavior in an effort to encourage them to be successful and find fulfillment in their chosen careers. Additionally, the panel will conduct a mock job interview session and share observations regarding hiring and supervising employees.

Advising Workshops
Focus on Advising: Workshop level 1: Introduction to Advising
Mary Moore
This workshop introduces new academic advisors to advisor and student responsibilities, expectations for advising a new student, the current advising and registration processes for the college, and the career and other support resources available to students. Upon completion of this workshop, new advisors will understand the college’s expectations for successful advising.
Date & Time: Tuesday, March 13, 3:00-4:30 p.m.
Location: Advising Center, Wynn Center, room 1200

Focus on Advising: Workshop Level 2: Student Information Systems (Registration Required)
Autumn McClenaghan
This workshop introduces new academic advisors to the current electronic student data systems and internet tools used for advising. Upon completion of this workshop, new advisors will be able to review student demographic information, transcripts, locate a PIN number, and use the internet to assist students with critical academic and career decisions. Please visit the Faculty/Staff Computer Training website to register.
Date & Time: Wednesday, March 14, 3:00-4:30 p.m.
Location: Advising Center, Wynn Center, room 1200

Focus on Advising: Workshop Level 3: Advising Challenges
Tom Jaynes
This workshop introduces specific challenges advisors often encounter when working with low income, international, and special students. Upon completion of this workshop, new advisors will be introduced to resources to assist students with transfer courses, student visas, transportation, childcare, and financial concerns.
Date & Time: Thursday, March 15, 3:00-4:00 p.m.
Location: Advising Center, Wynn Center, room 1200

Focus on Advising: Advising DS students (repeat )
Christine Kelly-Kleese
Date & Time: Friday, March 16, 11a.m.
Location: Advising Center 1200 Wynn Center

Focus on Advising: Workshop Levels 1-3: Comprehensive Introduction to Advising
(Registration Required)
Tom Jaynes, Autumn McClenaghan, and Mary Moore
This workshop combines the information presented in the Introduction to Advising, Student Information Systems, and Advising Challenges workshops into one in-depth workshop. Upon completion of this workshop, new advisors will understand the college’s expectations for advising, become familiar with the student data systems used for advising, and will be introduced to resources used to assist students with common questions and needs. Please visit the Faculty/Staff website to register.
Dates & Times:
Tuesday, March 27, 9:00-12:00 a.m.
Wednesday, March 28, 3:00-5:00 p.m.
Friday, April 13, 9:00-12:00 a.m.
Location: Advising Center, Wynn Center, room 1200

April 3
Communicating Effectively with Non-Native English Speakers
Karin Abell
Tech Center, room 904   2:30 p.m.
This presentation and discussion session will include teaching tips and strategies for giving feedback to students whose first language is not English.

April 10
Socrates Bar & Grill: Teaching and Learning the Scientific Method: Using Scientific Reasoning as Everyday Philosophy
Jorge Cortese
Wynn Center, room 1115   3 p.m.
Understanding scientific reasoning is a key skill to critically understand the world around us. We will show simple ways to use the principles and steps of the scientific method in your classroom to foster discussion in a range of issues and to facilitate learning when dealing with complex information. For those teaching non-technical subjects, we will also discuss how scientific thinking compares to other intellectual and philosophical systems to support inquiry-based leaning.

April 19
ENG 095: What is it and who should take it?
Lyndsay Massengill
Wynn Center, room 1115   2 p.m.
Lyndsay Massengill will discuss the purpose behind the newly revamped ENG 095 course and will offer a description of the type of student that should be encouraged to take it. Advisors of Developmental students will find this presentation of great interest.

April 20
HELP!!!!!!!! R U There?–Effective E-mail in the 21st Century (repeat)
Kerry Cantwell
Collins Building, room 2905   10 a.m.
How can students and faculty communicate better in an electronic environment? This workshop will focus on composing and responding to messages appropriately as well as some of the current conventions of netiquette. We will look at ways of modeling proper e-mail composition as well as setting expectations and standards for students up front.

April 26
Breaking Through to African American Males at Durham Tech
Demetrius Thompson
Collins Building, room 203   2 p.m.

May 2
Socrates Bar & Grill: The Many Hats We Wear!
Elizabeth Smith
Phillips Building, room 325     12:30-1:30 p.m. [Wynn Faculty/Staff Lounge, alternate location]
What is the balance between professional and personal roles?
You may bring a brown bag lunch…

May 14, 15, 16
Training for ACA 111 instructors
Wynn Center, Multi-purpose room   8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
This three-day training prepares instructors to teach ACA 111: College Student Success. The training is facilitated by Penny Gluck and Gabby McCutchen. Please make a reservation [required] to attend through the facilitators.


Fall 2006

August 8
New Faculty Orientation (Registration Required)
TLC Advisory Committee
Collins Building, Room 278, 4:30-8:00 p.m.
New full-and part-time faculty members will meet to learn about Durham Tech and receive valuable information about teaching and learning at the college.

August 9
New Faculty Orientation (Registration Required)
TLC Advisory Committee
Collins Building, room 278, 10:30 a.m. -2:00 p.m.
New full-and part-time faculty members will meet to learn about Durham Tech and receive valuable information about teaching and learning at the college.

August 10
Achieving the Dream
Speaker: David Dodson, President, MDC, Inc.

August 22
Excellence in Teaching Portfolio Development
Bonnie Tilson
Collins Building, room 286   4-5 p.m.
Faculty members are invited to learn more about how to develop their teaching portfolios at this popular event. Materials will be provided. This will be our only EIT workshop this semester.

August 29
What Our Students Said on the Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE)
LaSylvia Pugh
August 29 – 2 p.m., Collins Building, room 286
How often do Durham Tech students make class presentations? How often to Durham Tech students discuss grades or assignments with instructors? Find out during this discussion of full-time and part-time Durham Tech students’ responses to the Community College Survey of Student Engagement (CCSSE).

September 6
Re: HELP!!!!!!!! R U There?–Effective E-mail in the 21st Century
Kerry Cantwell
2 p.m. Tech Center, room 981
How can students and faculty communicate better in an electronic environment? This workshop will focus on composing and responding to messages appropriately as well as some of the current conventions of netiquette. We will look at ways of modeling proper e-mail composition as well as setting expectations and standards for students up front.

September 11
Spanish Language Conversation Hour #1
Marianela Mañana
12-1 p.m., Phillips Building, room 309
These five sessions offer an opportunity for anyone in the college to come for informal conversation in Spanish – or you can just listen. Bring a brown bag lunch if you want.

September 12
Effective communications environment: Maintaining an ingroup for retention and positive student performance
Mary Anne Grabarek and Peter Wooldridge
2:30 p.m., Collins Building, room 286

September 14
Faculty Voices from the Community College Faculty Survey of Student Engagement (CCFSSE)
LaSylvia Pugh
2 p.m., Collins Building, room 286
During the spring of 2005, 85 full-time and 84 part-time Durham Tech faculty members participated in the Community College Faculty Survey of Student Engagement (CCFSSE). Join LaSylvia Pugh for a lively discussion of what the full-time faculty said and what the part-time faculty said about student engagement. Is there a difference?

September 15
Hybrid Format for Science Courses: Getting the Best of Both Worlds
Julie Rothwell and Jorge Cortese
10 a.m., Collins Building, room 201
Hybrid formats of a course can be designed to combine the best instructional techniques of traditional and online courses. For students, requirements are less demanding than in the online classroom; for instructors, the format is very flexible and creates an environment that encourages the use of multiple teaching techniques in the most effective form. Using examples from their recently reformatted science courses, Julie Rothwell and Jorge Cortese will show how hybridization can make science courses into ideal vehicles for technological improvements that enhance student learning.

September 18
Spanish Conversation Hour #2
12-1 p.m., Phillips Building, room 309

September 20
Non-returning Student Survey –Update
Sheza Healey
2-3 p.m. Collins Building, room 261
“Balancing my everyday schedule with classes was hard.” “It was difficult to go back to school at my age.” “Homework. I just wasn’t used to doing it after being out of school for a while.” These are some of the survey comments given by non-returning students. Please join Sheza Healey, research coordinator and English instructor, for a comparison and contrast of last year’s AtD survey results with the 2006 results. Gain insights and explore data as we discuss our non-returning students.

September 21
Student Code of Conduct: Outside the Classroom
Tom Jaynes and Lyndsay Massengill
2-3:30 p.m. Collins Building, room 286
This panel discussion will focus on disruptive and inappropriate behaviors in the non-classroom environment. Come hear what several panelists have to say about the Student Code of Conduct and learn more about its impact across campus.

September 25
Spanish Conversation Hour #3
12-1p.m., Phillips Building, room 309

September 29
Making Classes Enjoyable Without Making Them Easier
Julie Rothwell
11a.m. – Collins Building, room 290
Tired of looking out into a sea of bored faces? Frustrated by the lack of interest in your course? Come learn how to make your classes more enjoyable for students without sacrificing course material or making things too easy.

October 2
Spanish Conversation Hour #4
12-1 p.m., Phillips Building, room 309

October 3 & 4
Advising Workshop Level 1: Introduction to Advising
Tuesday, October 3, 3-4:30 p.m. OR
Wednesday, October 4, 9-10:30 a.m.
Wynn Center, room 1200
This workshop introduces new academic advisors to advisor and student responsibilities, expectations for advising a new student, the current advising and registration processes for the college, and the career and other support resources available to students. Upon completion of this workshop, new advisors will understand the college’s expectations for successful advising.

October 5
Choosing to Succeed in the Workplace Math
Discipline faculty, 3 p.m.- Collins Building, room 286
Members of the Mathematics faculty will lead a discussion about assisting students in choosing appropriate workplace behavior in an effort to encourage them to be successful and find fulfillment in their chosen careers.

October 9
Spanish Conversation Hour #5
12-1 p.m., Phillips Building, room 309

October 10 & 11
Advising Workshop Level 2: Student Information Systems (Registration Required)
Tuesday, October 10, 3-4:30 p.m. OR
Wednesday, October 11, 9-10:30 a.m.
Wynn Center, room 1200
This workshop introduces new academic advisors to the current electronic student data systems and internet tools used for advising. Upon completion of this workshop, new advisors will be able to review student demographic information, transcripts, locate a PIN number, and use the internet to assist students with critical academic and career decisions. Please visit the Faculty/Staff Computer Training website to register.

October 17 & 18
Advising Workshop Level 3: Advising Challenges
Tuesday, October 17, 3-4:30 p.m. OR
Wednesday, October 18, 9-10:30 a.m.
Wynn Center, room 1200
This workshop introduces specific challenges advisors often encounter when working with low income, international, and special students. Upon completion of this workshop, new advisors will be introduced to resources to assist students with transfer courses, student visas, transportation, childcare, and financial concerns.

October 20
Advising Workshop Levels 1-3: Comprehensive Introduction to Advising
(Registration Required)
Friday, October 20, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. (repeated later in the semester – see below)
Wynn Center, room 1200
This workshop combines the information presented in the Introduction to Advising, Student Information Systems, and Advising Challenges workshops into one in-depth workshop. Upon completion of this workshop, new advisors will understand the college’s expectations for advising, become familiar with the student data systems used for advising, and will be introduced to resources used to assist students with common questions and needs. Please visit the Faculty/Staff website to register.

October 23
Wind in the Pines Amid Ten Thousand Valleys
Liz Penton
3:30 p.m.- Phillips Building, room 381
Taoist, Confucian and Buddhist spiritual principles under gird a proper reading of traditional Chinese landscape painting. Take this opportunity to stroll through a variety of soothing mountain and stream-filled venues while effortlessly learning about philosophical tenets of the East.

October 24
Introduction to Rubrics
Marianne Williams and Penny Gluck
3-4 p.m.- Collins Building, room 286
In this workshop participants will be asked to bring an assignment for which they wish to create a rubric.

October 27
Advising Students in Developmental Studies Courses
Friday, October 27, 10-11 a.m.

Wynn Center, room 1200
This workshop introduces new academic advisors to the developmental studies program. Upon completion of this workshop, new advisors will gain a greater understanding of the requirements for developmental studies courses, the unique challenges faced by students who place into developmental studies, and the support options available for ensuring academic success.

October 30
Psychology of African-Americans
Brenda Flippen
3:30 p.m. – Phillips Building, room 381
Is Black Psychology necessary? Are African-Americans really that different? Is there a relationship between the missing Black male and the Strong Black Women (SBW)? How are African-American families different from other family units? What does Black identity mean? Join the discussion when these and other questions will be explored.

November 1
Communication across Campus through the Colleague System
Robin Lamb, 1 p.m.
Phillips Building, room 309
Come to this session to find out what’s new with Colleague and how it will affect you!

November 3
Level 1 – 3: Comprehensive Introduction to Advising (Registration Required)
Friday, November 3, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. (repeat of earlier session)
Wynn Center, room 1200
This workshop combines the information presented in the Introduction to Advising, Student Information Systems, and Advising Challenges workshops into one in-depth workshop. Upon completion of this workshop, new advisors will understand the college’s expectations for advising, become familiar with the student data systems used for advising, and will be introduced to resources used to assist students with common questions and needs. [repeat of earlier session] Please visit the Faculty/Staff website to register.

November 3
Writing Learning Outcomes and Imbedding learning outcomes in assignments
9 a.m.-4 p.m., Collins Building, room 290
Larry Kelley, specialist in learning outcomes assessment, will provide a working nut-and-bolts session for faculty members who want to write learning outcomes and embed them in their class assignments. REGISTRATION REQUIRED

November 6
Socrates Bar & Grill: Lincoln and Franklin: Masters of Rhetoric
Marcia Daniell
2 p.m. – Phillips Building, room 309
These sessions provide an opportunity for the entire Durham Tech community to discuss philosophical issues.  In the first few moments of a speech or the initial paragraphs of an essay, the writer establishes his or her credibility: the ethos of the speaker. The persuasive value of the speaker’s or writer’s character is labeled the ethical appeal by Aristotle. Such an ethical appeal is exerted “when the speech itself impresses the audience that the speaker is a man of sound sense (phonÿsis), high moral character (arete), and benevolence (eunoia). Notice it is the speech itself which must create this impression.” We will discuss techniques used by two masters of the ethical appeal, Lincoln and Franklin, to establish credibility in the opening paragraphs of letters and speeches.

November 8
What’s New in Developmental Math
Christine Kelly Kleese and Vernon Bridges
3:00 p.m., Phillips Building, room 381
Did you know that more than half of all students taking math courses during fall 2005 and spring 2006 were enrolled in just three courses: MAT 050, 060, or 070? Over 2,000 students enroll in these courses every year. Come find out more about developmental math at Durham Tech.

November 9
The Kellogg Experience: What I Learned about Developmental Education
Lyndsay Massengill
2:00-3:00 p.m., Collins Building, room 286
Come to this discussion and hear about my experience at the Kellogg Institute at the National Center for Developmental Education in Boone, NC. I spent one month in training this summer to learn more about how to improve our Developmental Studies Program. Hear about how my experience may affect you in the near future.

November 10
What’s New in the Technology of the classroom?
Tom Murphy
10-11a.m., Tech Center, room 983
Tom Murphy will provide an up-to-the-minute look at the computer technology available to faculty members for classroom use.

November 14
101 (or maybe just 3) Things You Can Do to Strengthen your Writing
Tracy Constantine and Perry Cumbie
11 a.m. – White Building, room 71
Grammar-phobes, fear not! This session will cover three simple strategies — and none of them involves a semicolon — for strengthening any kind of writing. Bring along a pen or pencil.

November 16
The Impact of Globalization in Latin America: Some Economic and Environmental Aspects
Hugo Castillo
2 p.m. – Collins Building, room 286
A brief exploration of the ways in which globalization is affecting countries and communities throughout the region and the responses to these changes.

November 17
Roundtable: Oral Communication in the Classroom
10-11 a.m. Phillips Building, room 373
Dillon Wilson will lead a discussion about how we use oral presentations to enhance learning in the classroom. Participants are encouraged to bring oral communication class projects and/or assignments that they have used or would like to use in their classes. Dillon will share some ideas for improving students’ oral communication skills and suggest some guidelines for students who use technology in their oral presentations.

November 28
Community of Scholars: Video-Conferencing Across the Globe
3:30 p.m. Tech Building, room 900
Peter Wooldridge will lead this discussion of the opportunities available for videoconferencing. The discussion will begin at 3:30 and the videoconference will begin at 4:00 PM. Dr. Judea Pearl, father of Daniel Pearl, the journalist slain in Pakistan, will discuss his work to establish a Jewish-Muslim dialogue. Dr. Pearl is the director of the Cognitive Systems Lab at UCLA and a student of the Israel – Palestinian conflict. Participants will be able to engage in a discussion with Dr. Pearl and other participants from around the globe.

December 4
Writing Test Questions
3:30 p.m.- Collins Building, room 261
Mack Henderson will discuss tips for writing T/F questions, multiple choice questions, matching, short answer, and essay questions. Do’s and don’ts, good and not-so-good examples will be provided.